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September 2016 newsletter - Read about:
NEW Moose Hunting Rule
Winter Tick and Moose Update
Fish Access to South Branch Lake
Eating Wild Foods
Preventing Riverbank Erosion
Zero Waste on Community Days - THE RESULTS
 
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Newsletter from the Penobscot Indian Nation Department of Natural Resources

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ATTENTION MOOSE HUNTERS

The Penobscot Nation Chief and Council has designated Alder Stream Township as a “bulls only” hunting area this year for moose.  This is a result of data that has come out of a research project being conducted in western Maine.  A large percentage of young moose are being lost to parasite loads, primarily winter tick.

If you know any hunters that did not get this email announcement please feel free to help us spread the word by forwarding it to them.

This rule change is in the new Chapter VII law book - click here to view the law book.
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What is DNR doing about current issues affecting moose?

Maine is fortunate enough to have the highest moose population in the lower 48 states, with a statewide estimate of 75,000 (http://www.maine.gov/ifw/wildlife/species/mammals/moose.html).  However, our moose are also affected by the same problems faced in other places - brain worm, lungworm and winter tick.  When an animal is a host to 2 or 3 of these parasites, the moose is often weakened to the point that it cannot survive.  Click here for more information on these issues.

DNR is taking this issue seriously and will be collecting some of the same data from moose on PIN territories as the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is elswhere.  Biologist Kristin Peet and her technician will be visiting tagging stations and asking hunters from PIN lands if they can collect biological data from their harvested animals.  Information of sex, weight, antler spread, age, overall health, and tick loads will be recorded to better understand the condition of moose on PIN lands.  If hunters would like to help or if anyone has any questions, please contact Kristin Peet at 207-817-7363 (work) or 207-991-1470 (cell).
 
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Fish Have Better Access to South Branch Lake!

South Branch Lake is capable of producing 500,000 returning adult alewives every year - as long as the fish can get there.  So, the Fisheries Program worked on reconstructing the lake's outlet in 2016 to allow for fish passage at all flows and to maintain a more stable lake level.  The original remnant boulder “dam” was not providing fish passage in and out of the lake and was structurally unstable.

The Penobscot Nation, in partnership with the US Dept. Of Agriculture/Natural Resource Conservation Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service/National Oceans and Atmospheric Administration, Maine Dept. of Marine Resources, the Atlantic Salmon Federation and the Nature Conservancy spent close to $500,000 on building the new structure and building the access road. In future years this could be the site of a Tribal alewife harvest.

Use the links below to learn more about fish passage and related projects on the Penobscot River:

https://www.habitatblueprint.noaa.gov/habitat-focus-areas/penobscot-river-maine/

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/stories/2015/12/spotlight_atlantic_salmon.html

For more information, contact Penobscot Nation Fisheries Biologist Dan McCaw.  Dan.mccaw@penobscotnation.org   Office phone: (207) 817-7377
 
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Eating Wild Foods - Safety Information

Wild foods are a traditional part of the Penobscot sustenance diet.  And there are many good reasons to eat them!  The Water Resources Program is leading an effort to give you more information about the contamination you might find in different types of wild foods by making a series of brochures and posters.  We will be providing recommendations about how much of different types of food it would be safer to eat as well as how some contaminants get into wild foods.

We are working with a company called Water Words That Work (www.waterwordsthatwork.com) to make sure the brochures and posters are as clear and good-looking as possible.  We asked a group of Penobscot citizens to provide us with input on a selection of 6 different designs and used the one that was the most popular!

The brochure on fish is nearly complete and will be on the web site and in print soon - see the cover preview below.  Be on the lookout for more information about these in the near future! 
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Preventing Riverbank Erosion

If you were around Indian Island late this summer you may have wondered about the heavy equipment activity behind the Community Building.  This was a project funded by Brookfield Renewable Energy, the owner of the Milford Dam, to stabilize the eroding river bank.  As a condition of its license to operate the dam the company meets with PIN DNR to identify, plan, and stabilize areas where erosion connected with the dam is occurring.

The purpose of the project is to prevent the loss of tribal land and to protect water quality by preventing soil from going into the river.  Another benefit is preventing tribal artifacts that might be in the river bank from washing away into the river.  The work, done by Thornton Construction, involved placing large boulders along the bank edge to create a footing or toe, backfilling the bank with smaller rocks and topsoil, planting grass seed, and mulching the area with hay to prevent bare soil from washing away into the river. 

We would like to thank employees and visitors of the Community Building for your patience and cooperation while the project was underway!
 
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Zero Waste Community Days 2016 -
ALIVIA'S REPORT ON THE RESULTS

Community Days 2016 was a great reminder of who we are-- a strong, connected, resilient, hopeful people! 

Phase One of becoming a Zero Waste Event was a grand success! 87 people brought their own dishes to the Community Meal on Saturday. 87 people!! We greatly reduced the waste from our celebration. Compost was implemented at the Community Safety Walk BBQ, compost and recycle were implemented during Saturday's meal. People didn't want to stop recycling so we ended up setting up recycling on Sunday as well! The compost went back to The Peoples' Garden. Truly I was blown away by the enthusiastic support for becoming Zero Waste and being gentler on our Mama!

Next year will be even better and we look forward to you supporting however you can:)

Our rockin' GREEN TEAM was:
Alexis Ireland
Shantel Neptune
Ian
Andrea Metciwitz
Tami Connolly
Amy Cocchia
Lizbeth Lopez

A big shout out to Old Town-Orono YMCA for donating a one month family membership toward the raffle.  Congratulations to the winners of three raffles - Richard Shay, Jill Thompkins and Viola Cotta!
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Copyright © 2016 Penobscot Indian Nation, All rights reserved.


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